Green makes pro debut for Bayern Munich in Champions League match

FC Bayern Muenchen v Hansa Rostock - A Juniors Championship First Leg

By DAN KARELL

In a match that gave Bayern Munich a record 10th-consecutive victory in UEFA Champions League play, another milestone was achieved as well.

Just a few weeks after signing his first ever professional contract with the German giants, 18-year-old attacking midfielder Julian Green made his full debut on Wednesday afternoon, entering as a second half substitute in Bayern’s 3-1 victory at CSKA Moscow.

With the match already beyond reach, the young German-American entered in the 88th minute in place of goal-scorer Mario Götze. Green didn’t have a chance to record a touch before the final whistle, but his rise to the first team comes after a strong start with the Bayern Munich reserve squad, where he has scored 15 goals in 18 matches.

Green was included in the Bayern squad for the Champions League match in Moscow due to a number of injuries in the first team. Established players such as Mario Mandzukic, Franck Ribery, Bastian Schweinsteiger, and Claudio Pizarro all were unavailable for the midweek game.

The Florida-born Green accepted but later declined a call-up to the U.S. Men’s National Team to train during their November camp. Green declined after realizing that he’d have to file a one-time switch with FIFA in order to play for the USMNT in their two friendly matches. Green is currently cap-tied to Germany after featuring for their Under-19 side in UEFA U-19 Championship qualification matches.

Green is still eligible to represent either the United States or Germany at the international level.

Bayern’s victory on Wednesday assured them of a place in the Champions League knockout round, meaning that their final group stage match against Manchester City at home will only serve to determine who finishes in first place. Since Bayern is participating at the Club World Cup (Dec. 17-21) as defending Champions League title holders, there’s a good chance that Green could see more first team action either in the game against Man City or in the Club World Cup.

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What do you think of this news? Glad to see Green make his Champions League debut? Do you see Green playing in the next Champions League match against Man City?

Share your thoughts below.

This entry was posted in Americans Abroad, European Soccer, Featured, UEFA Champions League. Bookmark the permalink.

45 Responses to Green makes pro debut for Bayern Munich in Champions League match

  1. Josh says:

    Really cool to see an American play for Bayern Munich. But does anyone know the chances he plays for the USMNT? All signs seem to point to him choosing Germany over the US. I hope I’m wrong, but that’s the way it looks.

    • Freddie Footballer says:

      I think he’s leaving his options open. Although it sounds like wants to play for US, he necessarily wish to turn his back on Germany. I think though if he continues to see more minutes and play well, Grrmany will put more pressure on him to play for that national team.

    • beto says:

      your guess is as good as anyone’s.. there are no signs of him either deciding on Germany or USA and probably won’t be until next fall at the earliest. no point in speculating what he will do, seeing that none of us actually know him!

      as for now, very cool to see a American crack the FCB lineup!

      • John says:

        So Julian declining to join the USMNT for the last two games and opting instead to play for the German U19s is not clear enough indication that he wants to play for Germany over the US ?

        • wfrw07 says:

          No, it was a fairly clear indication that playing for the US would have made his mind up, which he isn’t ready to do. Playing for Germany did not tie him anywhere, so he opted to go with that.

          He chose to play for the US in that window first, and then when he realized he couldn’t actually play, then he decided to play for Germany.

        • froboy says:

          Nope, playing for Germany doesn’t lock him up, playing for the US means he can never again play for Germany

    • Ooh Klinsi you shouldn't have says:

      I actually think he’s leaning more with the US side, but just isnt fully ready to do the one time switch and divert time away from the big dream of playing for bayerns 1st team. If you think about it, its kind of silly to even be pondering international stuff at this point in his career. But I believe the afro-germans have a little brotherhood developing on the usmnt, and over time green will decide he wants to be a part of that.

    • GW says:

      Put yourself in his shoes.

      This decision will have life long consequences. It’s not unlike choosing a college. Except some of us don’t have any choice
      .
      In his case he has two very attractive options.

      Why on earth would he want to rush his decision especially when he does not really have to? And when the more important item on his plate is possibly breaking in the first team.
      Wouldn’t you want to focus on that first? Once he has that settled then he can decide what country will really want him.

    • Joamiq says:

      For what it’s worth, Ives thinks Klinsmann is going to close this deal (at least as of a few SBI Shows ago – I’m a bit behind)

    • slowleftarm says:

      You know what will be cool? When we actually produce players in America good enough to play for Bayern Munich. I really believe that day is coming but falling all over ourselves to find players with tenuous connections to the US doesn´t really help the situation.

      • John says:

        Well are European clubs like Bayern even scouting young Americans playing here? My guess is outside of a few rare cases no they aren’t. It’s always going to be easier for a club to bring up a player already in there system.

        • John says:

          Would Gil or Yedlin be able to be starting in the Bundesliga if they were born in Germany? I’m sure everyone will just say no because they dont rate the MLS but I find it harder to know honestly. Both were very impressive at the U20 world cup against talented sides.

        • Joe+G says:

          It’s always tough because most American kids can’t get to Europe until they are 18 and that can be almost too late for some clubs. The lack of an EU passport and the lack of the same level of training means they aren’t as desirable.

      • Petro4ever says:

        That train’s never late…

      • GW says:

        “When we actually produce players in America good enough to play for Bayern Munich. I really believe that day is coming but falling all over ourselves to find players with tenuous connections to the US doesn´t really help the situation.”

        Mr. slow,

        First of all, you don’t know that it doesn’t help. Recruiting players from abroad is and always has been a part of the American system and not just in soccer. I notice the NCAA , that All American institution, is perfectly fine with recruiting basketball players, just as one example, from all over the World. And I notice this has provided a pretty good pool of talent for the NBA another American institution. And I notice it has helped basketball in their countries as well.

        Green playing for Bayern is not unlike having Manu play for the San Antonio Spurs. Ginobli’s tenure in San Antonio is good for the Spurs and good for Argentina.

        Second, Green has more than a” tenuous connection” with the US . His English appears to be excellent.

        From Brian Scaretta:
        “Born in Tampa, Florida, on June 6, 1995, Green is the son of an American father and a German mother. When he was two years old, he moved to Munich with his mother and older brother. He would, however, maintain strong ties to the United States frequently returning to Florida to visit his father and extended family.
        “We did a lot of things sports-wise,” said Julian’s father, Jerry Green. “Even at the early ages, Julian always had a ball in his hand. From the time he could walk, he would stand with a ball—any kind of ball: football, basketball—it didn’t matter. He used to play hockey and was a great hockey player. He eventually chose soccer.”

      • GW says:

        “When we actually produce players in America good enough to play for Bayern Munich. I really believe that day is coming but falling all over ourselves to find players with tenuous connections to the US doesn´t really help the situation.”

        First of all, how do know that it doesn’t help?

        Recruiting players from abroad is and always has been a part of the American system and not just in soccer. I notice the NCAA , that All American institution, is perfectly fine with recruiting basketball players, just as one example, from all over the World. And I notice this has provided a pretty good pool of talent for the NBA another American institution. And I notice it has helped basketball in their countries as well.

        Green playing for Bayern is not unlike having Manu play for the San Antonio Spurs. Ginobli’s tenure in San Antonio is good for the Spurs and good for Argentina.

        Second, Green has more than a tenuous connection with the US . His English appears to be quite good.

        From Brian Scaretta:
        “Born in Tampa, Florida, on June 6, 1995, Green is the son of an American father and a German mother. When he was two years old, he moved to Munich with his mother and older brother. He would, however, maintain strong ties to the United States frequently returning to Florida to visit his father and extended family.
        “We did a lot of things sports-wise,” said Julian’s father, Jerry Green. “Even at the early ages, Julian always had a ball in his hand. From the time he could walk, he would stand with a ball—any kind of ball: football, basketball—it didn’t matter. He used to play hockey and was a great hockey player. He eventually chose soccer.”

  2. John says:

    So does Landon have a Julian Green impression as well?

  3. Vic says:

    Ramos should have called him earlier this year for the U20 team. That way if he wanted to ever play even a friendly for Germany he would have to file a one time switch. Now its the other way around.

  4. dude says:

    Let’s hope his dad is really persuasive. He gets the choice of playing for the nation of his birth, or a team that has a strong chance of winning a World Cup in the near future.

  5. USMNT Fan says:

    Dangle a spot on the plane to Brazil and he will choose the USMNT. No way he opts for a chance to play for Germany when he can experience the World Cup now, especially in Brazil.

    • USMNT Fan says:

      Plus I can see Klinsmann selecting one young ‘project’ for the final world cup spot. I’d rather select a player who can make the Bayern bench than Stoke City bench (Shea).

    • John says:

      Yeah lets burn a spot on the World Cup team and leave home someone that put in work during qualifing. Thats a great message to send to the locker room.

      • USMNT Fan says:

        Klinsmann is only guaranteed a contract until the end of this World Cup cycle. Its an opportunity for managers as well as players to earn a more lucrative contract. He’ll need the best players to compete against the best teams in the world. So its logical to select the best you have at your disposal. Can’t argue with logic, John.

        • John says:

          No one has a clue how good he is or has even seen him play.

          • Andre Mariner says:

            I can with utmost certainty say that this kid would be the greatest prospect in USMNT history and would probably be an immediate starter.

            He just played in a match FOR BAYERN MUNICH UNDER PEP at 18 freaking years old.

            Real deal, hollywood. This isn’t potential. He’s already there.

      • Shawn says:

        the thing is he is better than klijestan, ej, boyd, beckerman, beasley etc. so yeah….

        • John says:

          How much have you seen him play again? The fact that you listed players from 4 different positions makes alot of sense as well.

  6. John says:

    Funny how a couple months ago we just had to have Brooks, he was the starting centerback for the next 10 years. Now we’ve all just moved on to the next shiny toy.

    • USMNT Fan says:

      Well you can only speak for yourself, so maybe you have moved on, but I still hold him in high regards and am sure I am not alone.

  7. MikeG says:

    Giuseppe Rossi 2.0 and probably like Rossi a shattered career representing Germany. A waste.

    • Nihal says:

      I think the difference between Green and Rossi is that Rossi never was going to play for the US. Green is actually giving us hope.

    • Love it or leave it says:

      Rossi will be in the world cup for italy in 2014

      Just had a goal for italy vs nigeria

      Also hes beating right now,, 13 goals in 11 games

    • Good Jeremy says:

      Yes, only completely different. Rossi was born and raised in the US by parents who both came to the US seeking a better life, then went to Spain to play soccer and decided along the way to represent Italy.

      Green was born in the US, raised almost his whole life in Germany by his German mother, and has spent his entire ‘career’ at a German club. If you had to choose a similar story it would be Johansssseon.

    • froboy says:

      He would be more like Rossi 2.0 if he plays for us than if he doesn’t. Kinda similar story but in reverse.

  8. Boyd says:

    We all know how this is going to work….if he ends up being as good as some predict then he’ll play for Germany.
    If he ends up not being that good to at least be a third stringer for Germany then he’ll play for us.
    At least that’s how it has worked out with the other Germans

    • USMNT Fan says:

      Even if that is the case. We’ll be investing in a young player with loads of potential and time to improve and prove others wrong.

  9. chuck says:

    If he plays for German youth teams, it can only make him a better player. Unless he is some kind of prodigy, we’re getting him after he does his run for their U-21s

  10. Stantson says:

    He’s black. The odds are in the US’s favor.

    • Good Jeremy says:

      I was going to reply with a comment about how insensitive what you just said is, but I mostly agree with you. I understand that there is rapid migration all over the world and that not every German looks like Bastian Schweinsteiger, but I can’t help but think that there is a strong cultural connection between the African-Germans or American-Germans. Growing up in a country where you are the obvious minority, especially for those who are bi-racial and lived near US military bases, may not be the most welcoming experience since there are racist ***holes and immature kids everywhere.

      • JGreen says:

        I agree with you “Good Jeremy” you are spot-on.

      • Frank says:

        Growing up in a country were 1 out of 3 black males will go to prison in their lifetimem, can also be difficult.

        link to huffingtonpost.com

        • Good Jeremy says:

          I completely agree…
          but is he reading articles about the US incarceration rates regularly, or is he dealing with the people in Germany regularly? I highly doubt that he justifies everything by stating “better picked on than in jail” when something offends him or he feels different than everyone else.

          • Frank says:

            agree. but we don`t know whether he was being picked on.
            On the contrary, he has probably had a priviledged life in Germany. If you are good at playing football in Germany you are treated like a god, regardless of your skin colour and/or background. He was probably the most popular kid at his school, got paid 4.000 Euro per month at the age of 14 and 10.000 Euro at the age of 16.
            The main difference between Julian Green and other German-Americans in the USMNT is that JG was not abandoned by his father. And I sense that someone who was not accepted by his own father struggles to feel accepted by the society he grows up in. Those disturbed relationships to their fathers or mothers have IMO a far bigger impact on those players than growing up black in Germany.

        • GW says:

          Frank,

          Green doesn’t have to grow up here anymore. He’s already got his passport.