Cosmos sign Kashiwase on-loan

SONY DSC

By DAN KARELL

Just hours after reports broke about the Cosmos landing a TV deal with an One World Sports, an English-language channel that covers sport in Asia, the New York Cosmos have secured one of Japan’s rising stars in soccer.

The Cosmos agreed a deal with Shimizu S-Pulse of the J-League in Japan to sign on-loan forward Satoru Kashiwase for the upcoming fall NASL season. The 20-year-old Japan youth international subsequently becomes the youngest Japanese soccer player to ever play in America.

The Cosmos also announced that they had come to terms with Brazilian midfielder Paulo Mendes, most recently with the Atlanta Silverbacks.

What do you make of this signing?

Share your thoughts below.

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72 Responses to Cosmos sign Kashiwase on-loan

  1. Old School says:

    Is that their stadium behind him?

    • William the Terror says:

      Indeed it is. The new version of the Cosmos intends to focus entirely on the indoor game. They have chosen the Flatiron Building as their venue because the narrow hallways negate the need for speedy wingers.

    • Chupacabra says:

      The Flatiron building is closer to Red Bull Arena than anywhere the Cosmos will be playing. There’s even a PATH train stop that takes you directly to RBA only one block away. The Cosmos are really a Long Island team. The photo should have been taken in front of Nathan’s in Coney Island or one of those piss clam restaurants near JFK.

      • jspech says:

        I know about that stop, screen right, 1 block West to 6thAve, then another 10 blocks South to 14th & 6Ave & another 7blocks South @ 9th st, & yet still yet another, 10 blocks North on 34th St but guess what, no one in NYC is interested in getting on to go to RBA.

        • Aguinaga says:

          7 PATH stops to get from 23rd and 6th in NYC to Harrison, NJ, or about 20-25 mins. The irony Chupacabra refers to is well noted. Jspech, not sure what your point is other than to sound bitter at the quality of the previous comment.

          • jspech says:

            point is soo many easy spots to jump on a path to get to RBA, get no one is interested in getting on. I could have done a PSA by listing all the subway connection t each point but why bother. Hope I cleared that up.

  2. sammysounder says:

    Does this mean that they’re going to try and out-spend the MLS and declare the NASL the top league in the USA? It almost seems like they’re hell-bent on repeating the same mistake they made last time.

    • PD says:

      I think it’s more likely that they are banking on becoming the biggest fish in NASL and then will vie for expansion one a third team becomes a viable option (or FCNY folds or the NYRB moves to Miami…. i kid i kid.)

      • Josh says:

        Of perhaps they just expect to have three teams in NYC? That logic would not surprise me from the higher ups

      • jspech says:

        I think you meant NYCFC, FCNY fold not to long ago. Buy the way how is NYCFC doing to trying to drum up supporter’s groups? Someone aught to remind them those things happens organically as in@ the grassroots.

    • Mike V says:

      Look at their roster. The have a decent collection of players with varying degrees of experience. I don’t think they’ve outspent anyone. Nor do you get the feeling that’s their objective. The new regime is aware of the Comos collapse and are keen not to repeat the same mistakes. It’s a different era and a different club. Yes, they do talk about the history but that has never come across, at least to me, as trying to replicate it. They want to be a recognizable club and are bound to make that happen. Will it happen??? Who knows. Time will tell. But I cannot fault their ambition and drive.

      • Aguinaga says:

        Agree with Mike V. Commendable efforts to go it alone if they have to, even if it seems like they’d like to establish themselves and the NASL as a rival / legit alternative to MLS. I see the Cosmos in MLS someday, they will get too big to ignore as an MLS candidate candidate eventually. Entertaining overall, especially the first time Metro sends them back to the 70′s in the Open Cup. ;)

    • Josh D says:

      Outspending MLS by acquiring youth players, veterans of the lower leagues, and broken, injury prone former MLS players? Sure. Next signing will be an out-of-retirement Pele and Cobi Jones.

      This is a fantastic signing for the team. I’ve wanted to see MLS dip more into the Korean and Japanese leagues. They might not be the most physical players, but their technique would help raise our own game. Getting a 20 year old youth Japanese international forward is great. He’s a loanee so there’s little investment up front; if he’s a success he’ll be a cheap purchase; and at a young age he’ll either be with them for many seasons or he’ll move on to a bigger league and give the Cosmos a big paycheck.

      And I know the brand is the new US soccer punching bag, but those jerseys just look so clean. As a Celtic fan, green and white are a classy combination.

      • Dillon says:

        I do not see why a Japanese or Korean player would come to the MLS when they can make just as much if not more money at home. Also, the J and K Leagues have just as good if not a better track record of sending top young talent to Europe like Kagawa, Son Heung-Min, and Nagatomo.

  3. joekaef says:

    Are the Cosmos banking on promotion/relegation in the (near) future? I never thought the USA would be able to support that kind of system, but these kinds of moves lead me to believe that the Cosmos might know something we don’t.

    • Gnarls says:

      They know as well as anyone that pro/rel is a pipe dream. They’re more likely banking on MLS expanding to three teams in NYC. If they ever get their stadium built and show good attendance numbers, it could happen.

  4. jake says:

    Why in the world would he sign?

    • zztoppppp says:

      Money and the chance to live in New York.

      Chances are he doesn’t know much about MLS, and he is just 20 years old, he is in it for the money and lifestyle, not necessarily to win yet.

      • zztoppppp says:

        And yes I do know that the Cosmos are not in MLS…

        • kpugs says:

          The money and the lifestyle? Playing minor league soccer in a country where major league soccer is a joke? There is NO WAY he is making more money here than he could have in an almost unlimited number of other countries. See Lee Nguyen if you doubt me even a tiny bit.

          • adam says:

            I get what you are saying but Nguyens situation was way different. They payed him so much money over there because he is Vietnamese and better than other Vietnamese players. They wouldn’t have payed a white or Hispanic player with the same skill level that much money.

        • Joe+G says:

          The real question is — does he????

      • Old School says:

        “Money and the chance to live in New York.”

        I’d be curious what his salary is because living in New York on an MLS-style salary must be brutal.

        • Brett says:

          I was thinking exactly the same thing.

        • jspech says:

          say it again, only one RB player lives in NYC that’s Henry in Soho, the rest resides in the state where their team pay taxes, NJ

          • odsum25 says:

            That isn’t true. Dax McCarty wrote about his move to Manhattan in a recent blog. I believe he mentioned that Pearce and Barklage live in the city as well.

          • Old School says:

            “say it again”

            I’m responding to the actual quote I provided, hence, my statement.

    • Frank says:

      PT. He’s part of a team that lists 34 players on their roster and according to Wikipedia he only played once since he joined the team in 2012. As a young prospect, he needs to find a way to get consistent playing time and a chance to improve and develop his game. Having that opportunity in NYC is just an added bonus.

    • Northzax says:

      Well, he has one goal in an early round cup game, and isn’t sniffing the pitch for the first team this year, so why not?

    • Josh D says:

      Opportunity. Make fun of the Cosmos, but outside of LA (thanks Beckham), the Cosmos still has the most pedigree abroad. He’s more likely to know them than Dallas, DC, Chivas, etc.

      He’s coming here because he has ambition outside of Japan. The J-League isn’t a feeder league like MLS. And NASL is a feeder league for MLS. So as a 20 year old, he sees NYC and an opportunity to move up the soccer ladder, although at the moment the move is taking a step down the ladder.

      • SBI Troll says:

        Chivas? I know them, they’re that team from Guadalajara, yes?

      • adam says:

        Neither mls or the j league are “feeder” leagues. The j league has at least as many guys playing in europe as mls does. When i think of feeder leagues i think of liga do brasil the eredivisie and even ligue 1 looks like a feeder league to me now. They never buy any top talent and all their best players leave for the prem.

        • Judging Amy says:

          “ligue 1 looks like a feeder league to me now. They never buy any top talent and all their best players leave for the prem.”

          You mean aside from PSG, right?

          • WhiteHart says:

            And now Monaco, but for the most part, seems like Ligue 1 has been losing most of it’s top talent, while importing very little from other “top” leagues.

            Though I will admit I haven’t studied the transfer lists, just what it seems to me.

      • Kingly Alexander - Sankt Pauli! says:

        Any league that isn’t the premiership or la liga or seria a is a “feeder league”. Besides middle eastern leagues and Russia and Ukraine, which only throw millions around for talent.

        The J-League has sold more Japanese players to the Eredivisie, Bundesliga, England and other European leagues then MLS has sold to Europe. The J-league only hase a 4 yr lead on us, yet they’ve always had a relegation system and their academy’s are producing quality cut talent constantly.

      • Dillon says:

        Are you serious Josh D? Have you heard of Hulk, Kagawa, or Nagatomo? These guys are playing at clubs that are bigger than almost anyone to ever come out of the MLS. If anything, the J League has probably sent more top talent to European the MLS has.

  5. kpugs says:

    If he was really a rising star he’d have already played for the senior national team. Instead, he’s taking a GIGANTIC step down by signing up to play minor league soccer. Congrats bruh.

    • Josh D says:

      Gigantic step down? You make it sound as though he was in United’s reserves and Moyes told him he’s a starter next year.

      Not already playing for the national team is no reflection on a kid who has only a season under his belt. Especially now that Japan actually has a plethora of quality strikers.

      I don’t think other countries recognize “minor” leagues. It’s: do you pay me? OK then it’s a professional league. And who knows how much he’s earning? He could be making $100k for all we know.

  6. DC Josh says:

    The Cosmos’ wheeling and dealing will only benefit American soccer, with NASL becoming more competitive and exposed.

  7. indytrojan says:

    seems cosmos see the only chance to enter mls now is to become sussessful in nasl and then become an expansion side along with Orlando or Miami,whichever Beckham chooses,He is not allowed to own a team in LA or New York…So Cosmos are obviously betting on entering MLS with another team to bring the total to 22 teams….and then there is Phoenix,San Diego,San Antonio,Atlanta,Minneapolis, Sacramento,Orlando,Miami,…..many markets whowant MLS.

  8. buckyball says:

    With no salary cap setup like MLS, the Cosmos could buy their way to top dog status in NASL pretty quickly. Interesting to see if that causes the same league-wide financial meltdown to the new NASL as it did to the old. But then, the Cosmos’ plan is not to stick around anyway.

    • Kingly Alexander - Sankt Pauli! says:

      First part I agree with, but I doubt they’d be that naive

      If ur just being cynical, all I have to do is point u towards their current roster and then u know what ur saying is bs

  9. Chupacabra says:

    One World Sports is named that because it matches it viewership – one.

  10. adam says:

    the cosmos roster is starting to remind me of the QPR team that started this season in the BPL. they are a rag-tag group of misfit players that either never cut it at higher level teams or burned out and they’re mixed in with relative unknowns (which is what this guy seems to be). i cant help but think the early road for the cosmos will be quite bumpy….

    • Wispy says:

      A bunch of has-been’s and never-will-be’s, you say? By season’s end they’ll beat the Yankees in a one-game playoff to make the post-season.

      • Northzax says:

        White Sox. I got Jake Taylor laying down the bunt.

        • Wispy says:

          No, they beat the Sox to force the one-game playoff against the Yanks. Wild Thing struck out Clu Haywood with bases loaded in the top of the ninth to set the stage for Taylor’s bunt.

      • jspech says:

        Kinda like MLS, the Euro retirement league?

        • adam says:

          yes, if this were 1997….if you were going to classify the league as anything, it’d be a latin american league….

    • Josh D says:

      “a rag-tag group of misfit players”

      Well it’s kind of hard to create a team from scratch without having to assemble “misfit” players. NASL is not like MLS where the teams are forced to handover players. The Cosmos have to scour the US and abroad to find players.

      And calling QPR’s team a bunch of “players that either never cut it at higher level teams or burned out” is far from the truth. These guys played on top level teams or were seen as big marquee players: Granero, Wright-Phillips, Park, Remy, Boswinga, Cesar, and Mbia. Then you mix them with very accomplished players like: Green, Traore, Samba, Johnson, Onuha, Jenas, Hoillet, and Young. Their problem wasn’t talent, it was coaching. Much like City struggled when they brought together a new team, QPR needed a better man manager than they got. ‘Arry wasn’t the solution.

      • adam says:

        yes, those players you mentioned were seen as big players but never sustained anything significant at the highest level…again, relative level, but history shows they were better suited for lower level teams, not marquis ones, and that is what the cosmos roster looks like AT THE MOMENT.

        your point of ‘its hard to create a team from scratch’ is incorrect – the cosmos knew they were coming back, knew when they were going to sign players, and allegedly have the financial means to acquire any players they want and feel they can afford. if you think the MLS forces teams to hand over players (by strong-arming or via the draft) you clearly don’t pay attention to the caliber of players made available via these expansion drafts…they’re available for a reason…

        my point was that, like man city, the first few years of this new project will be bumpy….

  11. PetedeLA says:

    Personally, I think it’s awesome.

    If I were a New Yorker, instead of an Angeleno, I’d be all over it.

    I love the Galaxy’s success, but aside from the Riot Squad. There’s NOTHING I can identify with.

    I don’t live anywhere near Carson. In fact, I kind of resent paying to park there, when under normal circumstances, you’d have to pay ME to even drive down there.

    I get the feeling the Cosmos people are trying to create something special. A little bit international, a little bit retro, a bit urban, a bit alternative. As a city boy, I’m eating it up.

    I don’t see why everyone has to write something negative about the story.

    Facts are there are probably tons of soccer fans in New York.

    They don’t identify with the Red Bulls, and it stands to reason that there is a sizable population that does not want to be involved with this Man City/Sheik I-Don’t-Know-You business.

    A lot of guys who post on here are big fans of the Premiere League. I sense some people thinking, “Well, that’s what they do in England, so that’s how it should be done.” I completely disagree with that.

    Professional soccer in England is huge. But people forget the origins of these teams.

    It starts with interest to form a club, not interest to form a league.

    Of course, NASL is minor league. But compared to the top leagues, so is MLS.

    Full disclosure, I’m saying this as a Sankt Pauli fan. But before you laugh, there are thousands of us all over the world (and quite a few in Brooklyn, from what I understand).

    JMHO

    • Brett says:

      Having a league to compete with MLS would be a good first step toward a promotion/relegation system here. Every major league in the world has lower divisions that gain promotion to upper divisions, it’s what keeps smaller clubs afloat.

      • PetedeLA says:

        money and interest.

        This conversation needs to take place 20 years from now. Not any time soon.

        The interest is simply not there.

        And the money required to even be involved in MLS is too huge. Just flying a team and skeleton crew staff coast to coast a few times a year is extremely expensive.

        More importantly, who do people even want this? Do you know how heart breaking it is to go down a league? And once you start promotion and relegation, where does it end? Are promotion/relegation fans eager to see teams go into bankruptcy and then have to disappear altogether? Because that’s what would happen. Kids would grow up rooting for teams, then somewhere a business man would make a poor decision, and your team is GONE!

        I certainly don’t want that. I also don’t like the idea of all teams being run by multimillionaires and corporations.

        Everything bad about America is in England too, just in smaller amounts. England is not the answer.

        • PetedeLA says:

          In fact, I’d say most of Europe is not the answer.

          Do you really want to have a league where the championship is decided between the same 2 to 4 teams? I don’t.

          • Jerrod says:

            i definitely do not want that either

          • WhiteHart says:

            I don’t.

            But, I also don’t think the MLS playoffs are the end-all-be-all either. Seems as if regular season success does not give you a big boost at all.

            I definitely think the playoffs are exciting, but soccer more than any other sport to me, is about the whole season and results.

            Just seems really unfair (I hate that word) that if a teams best player gets hurt 2 weeks before the playoffs, you are basically f’ed, even if you have played better than everyone all season.

            I suppose a counter-argument could be made that teams with internationals would be at a huge disadvantage, but I just don’t think as it stands, that the supporters shield means much.

          • K says:

            this happens where?

      • K says:

        pro/rel will eventually happen here. We need to build up our D2.

        One reason so many MLS fans hate on the Cosmos and the NASL is because they know that Cosmos success and NASL success means pro/rel will happen.

        There is a very small minority of American soccer fans that are against pro/rel. They want MLS to be a cross between MLB and NFL with multiple divisions/wild cards and minor league affiliates. THIS IS NOT HOW SOCCER IS PLAYED AROUND THE GLOBE. Yet, these people want this. WHy? I think part of it is a resentment towards Europe.

        • JR says:

          and one of the reasons some people want pro/rel is because they live in small markets and know the only way to play at the highest level in this country is through pro/rel

        • PetedeLA says:

          I disagree.

          Suppose relegation were possible.

          Right now you need to pay a huge licensing fee in order to play in MLS.

          That isn’t going to go away any time soon, because all these teams have already paid it. You can’t make it free.

          So, given that, the top three teams would need to have a team good enough (expensive enough) to be in the top three of NASL.

          Then they would have to pay the huge licensing fee.

          Now, let’s pretend that all the MLS teams agree that new teams no longer have to pay the fee (keep dreaming).

          What would stop random multimillionaires from spots all over the globe from picking any random NASL team and trying to get into MLS? WHY WOULD ANYONE WANT THIS????

          Do you see the ramifications? Every year you would have a new Chelsea and Man City.

          People forget, in the big European countries, promotion and relegation is at least 6 divisions deep.

  12. slowleftarm says:

    I always cringe a little when RBNY goes a little overboard in trying to sell the “New York” connection (i.e. the “New York is my home” campaign). But when this clown club does it, it’s downright laughable. Did they move the Flatiron building to Hempstead?

    • jspech says:

      I don’t know too many NYer’s who’s heard of RBNY, or RBA. Red Bull New York? It that some stunt show?
      Nah, it’s a soccer team
      Word?, where do they play?
      Harrison, New Jersey.
      Harrison? Is that by the Jersey shore?
      Nah man, it’s offer of route80.
      Sorry man, never heard of it.
      If they in Jersey why are they call New York Red Bulls.
      I don’t know, probably marketing?
      Maketing? Sorry never heard of em, shitty marketing.
      I know!

      BTW, Springsteen doesn’t write songs about Coney Island, he writes about the Jersey Shore, have some pride.

  13. Kingly Alexander - Sankt Pauli! says:

    They’ll make a run through the US cup in a couple of years and then all the cynics will stfu.

    F NYCFC, the new whores of MLS and F the cancer in a bottle sports team that lives in the crap city of jersey